Available formats

Catidral

One sachet of CATIDRAL® contains diosmectite and elecrolytes. Diosmectite is a sort of natural clay characterized by a crystalline structure of very thin superimposed strips that give it a high absorption strength, allowing diosmectite to incorporate liquids in the intestinal lumen and thus increasing the consistency of excretion and slowing own expulsion. In this manner CATIDRAL® can also decrease the risk of dehydration due to diarrhea and help the hydrosaline balance return to normal, thanks to the product’s balanced dose of electrolytes. Diosmectite’s absorption strength also allows CATIDRAL® to interact with glycoproteins in the mucous membrane covering the gastroduodenal wall, by modifying their physical characteristics and generating a protective gel that protects against the hyper-secretion of acids and gastro-damaging substances.

Dose

For the first 3 days:

  • Children (1-12 months): up to 2 sachets per day (to be dissolved in baby bottle and divided into 2-3 dosed per day)
  • Children >1 year: up to 4 sachets per day
  • Adults: up to 6 sachets per day

Then continue with halved dosage until the full resolution of diarrhea.

Packaging

  • 12 sachets of powder
  • 20 sachets of powder
  • 30 sachets of powder

The Expert says

to learn more

Pasquale Romano, Export Manager for Spain, Portugal & Americas
Chiara Demi, Europe & Asia
Alessandra Oluwole, Africa & Middle East

Diarrhea

Diarrhea is defined as an emission of liquid or semi-liquid stools, which usually takes place in multiple daily discharges and more rarely in a single evacuation. During episodes of diarrhea, the abnormal characteristics of the stool are the consequence of the accentuation of the intestinal movements necessary to make the materials introduced by feeding progress in the intestine, the so-called intestinal peristalsis, which leads to an insufficient reabsorption of liquids and an increased secretion of fluids from the intestine.

This digestive system disorder can be caused by various causes: errors in food intake, excessive fermentation and putrefactive processes in the intestine, enteritis, colitis and other inflammatory or infectious diseases affecting the intestine. Intoxications of various origins are also important, which can also be the consequence of drug therapies or exposure to radiation for therapeutic purposes. In addition, diarrheas resulting from emotional stress are frequent.

Many forms of diarrhea, which occur recurrently in the cold period of the year or which can occur while traveling in tropical countries, have a bacterial or viral infectious origin. Infectious diarrhea is often accompanied by other characteristic signs and symptoms, such as vomiting, nausea and fever, induced by the pathogenicity of the virus or bacterium.

Diarrheas can be chronic. In this case they have inflammatory causes (Crohn’s disease, ulcerative rectocolitis), or they are caused by an enzyme deficiency (lactose intolerance), or by gluten intolerance (celiac disease).

When this is possible, the best cure for diarrhea is causal: if it is a form induced by a bacterium, the use of the antibiotic is necessary, if it is due to food intolerance, that specific food must be eliminated from the diet, etc. Often excellent results can be obtained by using substances with an adsorbent effect, which introduced into the intestine by mouth, passing along the gastrointestinal tract reduce the characteristic symptoms of diarrhea by absorbing excess fluids and the harmful substances dissolved in them.

Oncology diarrhea

Diarrhea is defined as an emission of liquid or semi-liquid stools, which usually takes place in multiple daily discharges and more rarely in a single evacuation. During episodes of diarrhea, the abnormal characteristics of the stool are the consequence of the accentuation of the intestinal movements necessary to make the materials introduced by feeding progress in the intestine, the so-called intestinal peristalsis, which leads to an insufficient reabsorption of the liquids and an increased secretion of fluids from the intestine.

This digestive system disorder can be caused by various causes: errors in food intake, excessive fermentation and putrefactive processes in the intestine, enteritis, colitis and other inflammatory or infectious diseases affecting the intestine. Intoxications of various origins are also relevant, which can also be the consequence of drug therapies. Some chemotherapy and radiation therapy can have toxic effects on the cells that form the mucous membrane of the digestive system, causing diarrhea. If the diarrhea lasts for several days, it can cause dehydration and electrolyte imbalances.

Whenever possible, the best cure for diarrhea is causative. In the specific case of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, it is the specialist doctor who evaluates how to proceed when diarrhea occurs. Symptomatology can often be alleviated by using substances that are introduced into the intestine by mouth, passing along the gastrointestinal tract reduce the characteristic symptoms of diarrhea and promote rehydration and saline reintegration. Given the sensitivity of the situation of the patient undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy, these substances are also to be taken under medical supervision.